Child Safety Week – Sharing is Caring

kids safety concept- little girl  climbing on baby chair

This year Child Safety Week takes place from 5th – 11th June and the theme is “Sharing Is Caring”.

The aim is to raise the risk of child accidents by parents, family and friends sharing their experiences and advice on how to prevent accidents and stay safe. Sharing your own experiences and wisdom really helps children to relate, rather than just being told what not to do. It can also remind you of the silly things kids do!

Your advice could relate to accidents in the home or when you’re out and about. Here are some tips on what you could share with your children during Child Safety Week…

Burns – There are lots of risks for being burnt in the home, from irons and ovens to candles and radiators. Not forgetting playing with matches of course. If you’ve ever burnt yourself on an oven tray you might have a small scar. If not, you can probably remember how much it hurt at the time! Share this with your child, show them the scar if you have one, and explain to them the dangers of going near anything hot.

Climbing – Kids love to climb! On sofas, tables, window ledges, you name it they can climb on it. Unfortunately this also means that kids fall a lot, and are also in danger of pulling heavy items on top of themselves. You might remember doing this when you were small and hurting yourself or maybe it was a sibling. If you have a scary experience share it.

Choking – Another thing that kids love to do, especially with small objects. Do you have a story of swallowing a penny or a doll’s shoe? Maybe you or a friend ended up having an X-Ray to find a little toy. Let children know that anything small should never go near their mouths by letting them know the consequences.

Drowning – Young children can drown in less than 2 inches of water. This could be a bath or a garden pond. Hopefully you have no experiences to share of this, but you might remember falling into some water if you were playing nearby.

 

We hope that by sharing your experiences of childhood accidents, you help your kids to realise the dangers to be found in the home.

Pogu – protect what matters

 

Sarah Cronshaw

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *